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Tagliatelle with cauliflower and bottarga recipe

Tagliatelle with cauliflower and bottarga recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Pasta
  • Pasta types
  • Tagliatelle

Bottarga is the pressed, dried fish roe from tuna or mullet. If you are lucky enough to find some in an Italian deli or at a market, try this recipe! It is truly a great combination of flavours!

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 300g cauliflower florets, divided
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • water, as needed
  • 200g tagliatelle pasta
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon grated bottarga
  • grated lemon zest, to taste
  • salt and pepper, to taste

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:15min

  1. Reserve half of the cauliflower florets; slice the rest.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and sliced cauliflower, stirring well to coat in oil. Season with salt and pepper and continue cooking for a few more minutes, then add a glass of water. Keep cooking until the cauliflower is soft, adding more water if needed. Remove form heat and transfer to a blender; process until smooth. Transfer back into the pan and keep the sauce warm.
  3. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil; add the remaining cauliflower florets and tagliatelle pasta; cook until al dente, about 10 or 11 minutes. Drain, reserving some of the cooking water.
  4. Toss cooked tagliatelle and cauliflower florets with the pureed sauce, adding a little of the pasta cooking water if needed and warming through over medium heat for a minute or so, until the pasta is well coated with the sauce.
  5. Remove from heat, add grated bottarga and lemon zest; toss well. Serve!

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Penne with Pork and Cauliflower


1 Pour the oil into a large skillet. Add the the garlic and cook over medium heat until golden, about 2 minutes. Add the pork and fennel seeds and stir well. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the meat is browned, about 15 minutes.

2 Add the wine and simmer 3 minutes, or until most of the liquid evaporates.

3 Add the tomatoes and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer 15 minutes or until the sauce is slightly reduced.

4 Bring at least 4 quarts of water to a boil in a large pot. Add the cauliflower and 2 tablespoons of salt. Cook until the cauliflower is tender, about 10 minutes. With a slotted spoon, scoop out the cauliflower and drain well. Do not discard the water.

5 Add the cauliflower to the sauce and cook, stirring frequently and breaking up the pieces with a spoon, until the sauce is thick, about 10 minutes more.

6 Bring the water back to a boil and add the pasta. Cook, stirring frequently, until the pasta is al dente, tender yet still firm to the bite. Set aside some of the cooking water. Drain the pasta.

7 Transfer the pasta to a heated serving bowl. Toss the pasta with the sauce, thinning it if necessary with the cooking water. Add the cheese and toss well. Serve immediately.

From "1,000 Italian Recipes." Copyright 2004 by Michele Scicolone. Used with permission of the publisher, Wiley Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Nutritional Facts:

This Penne with Pork and Cauliflower recipe is from the Cook'n in Italy Cookbook. Download this Cookbook today.


Roasting the cauliflower:

7 ounces of cauliflower floret
5 garlic cloves
1 tablespoon olive oil
salt
pepper
1 teaspoon chili flakes

For the parmesan-breadcrumb mixture:

1 tablespoon pine nut
½ cup parmesan, shredded
1 tablespoon butter
¼ cup breadcrumbs
pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil

7 ounces of tagliatelle corte (1 package)
pine nut for garnishing
fresh parsley for garnishing


Pasta con la Bottarga (Pasta With Bottarga) Recipe

Why It Works

  • Toasting whole garlic cloves in olive oil lends the sauce a subtle allium aroma without distracting from the main flavor of the dish: briny, salty bottarga.
  • Steeping grated bottarga off-heat in warm olive oil coaxes out its delicate aroma.
  • Cooking the pasta in a small amount of water produces super-starchy pasta water that is ideal for emulsifying the sauce, which is brought together simply by tossing and stirring the noodles off-heat.

Seafood is a prominent feature of Italy's regional coastal cuisines. While there's no shortage of unique seafood dishes that can only be found in specific villages at a certain times of the year, there's also a lot of overlap of culinary techniques and principles. Grilled fish at a restaurant on the Amalfi coast will look pretty similar to grilled fish in Ostia, even if the kind of fish used might be different odds are it'll be a whole fish, stuffed with sliced lemon and herbs, and it'll be filleted table-side.

For pastas, one of the tried and true templates for incorporating seafood is tossing a dried long pasta like spaghetti with aglio e olio e peperonciono (olive oil, garlic, and chile) and a briny regional delicacy. That specialty item could be tiny "vongole veraci" clams for spaghetti alle vongole, or colatura di alici, a fish sauce from the town of Cetara, for spaghetti con la colatura di alici. Or, if you're in Sardinia, it could be bottarga, for, you guessed it, spaghetti con la bottarga.

For the uninitiated, bottarga is a fish's roe sac—most commonly grey mullet—that is salted, massaged to expel air pockets, then pressed and dried. As Sho notes in his excellent guide to bottarga, it's not just a delicacy in Italy—known as karasumi in Japanese, and butarkah in Arabic, it's highly valued in cuisines across the globe. In Italy, mullet bottarga, or bottarga di muggine, is a specialty of Sardinia, where the roe sacs were traditionally sun-dried after salting. With a texture similar to cured egg yolks or a firm pecorino cheese, bottarga is perfect for grating, which unlocks its delicate but assertive mineral flavor and aroma. It's an ingredient made for pairing with pasta.

This simple dish starts by browning a couple of smashed garlic cloves in plenty of olive oil (you could also mince the garlic and gently cook it, or keep it raw as in my spaghetti con la colatura recipe). Once the oil is infused with the toasty allium aroma, the garlic comes out (you can rub the garlic on toast, repurpose it for another dish, or discard it) and chiles go in to bloom. I then remove the skillet from the heat and stir in a heaping handful of grated bottarga. Cooking bottarga is a no-no, seeing as high heat mutes its punchy flavor, but steeping the grated roe in warm olive oil coaxes out its best qualities.

The body provided by the grated bottarga, along with starchy pasta cooking water, helps to bring the sauce together into a creamy emulsion without the need for the on-heat finishing step called mantecatura. Some vigorous tossing and stirring is all you need to coat al dente spaghetti. Fresh lemon juice and zest, and some chopped parsley bring acidity and freshness to the dish. The pasta gets plated up and then showered with a fresh grating of bottarga to highlight its flavor in the first few bites.


Dinner Tonight: Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower, Chickpeas, and Ricotta Recipe

If you've never played around with the possibilities of dry-cooking chickpeas (which is to say, not stewing or pureeing them), I would highly recommend it. Unlike other legumes like beans that don't stand up to high heat, chickpeas have an amazing tendency to turn nutty and crisp in a skillet or when roasted. As it happens, so does cauliflower, which also turns super caramelized and almost meaty. This wonderful intersection is where this recipe is born.

Once the two are roasted (quite simply with salt, pepper, and olive oil) they get tossed with a dollop of ricotta for creaminess along with warm pasta and chopped parsley. Shells are ideal, since they catch and hold the ingredients.

The recipe, from Everyday Food magazine, also calls for croutons made right in the oven while the vegetables are roasting. They were good, but next time I'd leave them out. The crunchy, nutty chickpeas provide all the crunch you need.


Cauliflower Tagliatelle Alfredo I can’t stand cauliflower. What’s wrong with me? It’s not the texture, not so different from my beloved broccoli, nor the taste which is pretty neutral. It’s the smell. I can’t handle it. Shame on me, I’m just genetically predisposed to dislike the smell of one of the healthiest vegetable. I know quite a few people with Cilantro aversion and at least one person who can’t stand cucumber. None of these foods – when cooked – smells as bad as cauliflower, though. Every time I cook this type of cabbage it feels like making a stinky sulfur bomb in the kitchen! The “cauliflower gene” is definitely faulty in me. What can I cook with the vegetable I dislike the most? A cauliflower Alfredo Tagliatelle. This first course is pretty easy to make, quick (have you read my recipe?) and healthy: cauliflower is even recommended in herbal medicine to fight weakness and flu. Unfortunately making Cauliflower Alfredo Tagliatelle still involves a cooking procedure that releases in the air as much as smell as any other other recipe in which cauliflower is boiled. I couldn’t avoid it, but opening the windows and spending some time on the balcony while cooking it, helped a lot. It was worth the effort. Tagliatelle with Roasted Mushrooms and Cauliflower Cream

It’s been too long since I’ve posted a pasta recipe. And you know, pasta is my favorite food in the world. It’s so versatile and comforting… and cheap people! Now, my Cauliflower Cream is going to become your new favorite pasta sauce. Easy to create and delicious to eat paired with tagliatelle, peas and mushrooms. You simply have to try my Tagliatelle with Roasted Mushrooms and Cauliflower Cream. Yum.

I’m going to let you in on a little secret. Before I became a vegetarian I didn’t actually like creamy foods. Yes, I’ll admit this is partly because I was terrified of getting fat (giant eye-roll at myself). But also because no matter how yummy the dish looked I was always left feeling heavy and bloated afterwards.

Since giving up meat I find myself craving creamy foods. But that doesn’t mean I want to eat something with no nutritional value and a tone of calories just because it tastes good. This whole veggie thing I’m doing is all about being kind to my body (after so many years of not).

This means eating yummy stuff that makes me feel happy, is easy on my digestion, nourishes my insides – you get the picture.

Cauliflower is a wonderful source of Vitamin C, folate and B6. The cashews are full of good fats and protein. Together they become a lovely, pale, creamy sauce that tastes so good with pasta. And don’t worry, this isn’t some obscure, tricky recipe that only appeals to adults. The kid loves the stuff.

Paired with the deep, earthy flavours of roasted mushrooms and the bright pop of baby peas, this pasta dish will have them coming back for seconds. Give it a go for dinner this week and let me know what you think.


Shells with Cauliflower and Cheese


1 Pour the oil into a skillet large enough to hold the cooked pasta. Add the onion and cook over medium heat 5 minutes. Add the cauliflower and salt to taste. Cover and cook 15 minutes or until the cauliflower is tender. Stir in the parsley and black pepper to taste.

2 Bring at least 4 quarts of water to a boil in a large pot. Add 2 tablespoons of salt, then the pasta. Stir well. Cook over high heat, stirring frequently, until the pasta is al dente, tender but still firm to the bite. Drain the pasta, reserving some of the cooking water.

3 Add the pasta to the skillet with the cauliflower and stir well over medium heat. Add some of the cooking water if needed. Add the cheese and toss again with a generous grinding of black pepper. Serve immediately.

From "1,000 Italian Recipes." Copyright 2004 by Michele Scicolone. Used with permission of the publisher, Wiley Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Nutritional Facts:

This Shells with Cauliflower and Cheese recipe is from the Cook'n in Italy Cookbook. Download this Cookbook today.


Pasta with Cauliflower, Saffron, and Currants


1 In a small bowl, sprinkle the saffron threads with 2 tablespoons of hot water. Place the currants in another bowl with hot water to cover. Let both stand about 10 minutes.

2 Bring at least 4 quarts of water to a boil in a large pot. Add 2 tablespoons of salt and the cauliflower. Cook, stirring frequently, until the cauliflower is very tender when pierced with a knife, about 10 minutes. Remove the cauliflower with a slotted spoon, reserving the water to cook the pasta.

3 Pour the oil into a skillet large enough to hold the cooked pasta. Add the onion and cook over medium heat 10 minutes. Add the anchovies and cook 2 minutes more, stirring frequently until they dissolve. Stir in the saffron and soaking liquid. Drain the currants and add them to the skillet.

4 Stir in the cooked cauliflower. Scoop up some of the cooking water and add it to the skillet with the cauliflower. Cook 10 minutes, breaking up the cauliflower with the back of a spoon, until it is in small pieces. Add salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the pine nuts.

5 While the cauliflower cooks, bring the cooking water back to a boil. Add the pasta and stir well. Cook over high heat, stirring frequently, until the pasta is al dente, tender yet still firm to the bite. Set aside some of the cooking water. Drain the pasta, then add it to the skillet with the cauliflower mixture. Stir well, adding some of the cooking water if the pasta seems dry.

6 Serve the pasta sprinkled with the toasted bread crumbs.

From "1,000 Italian Recipes." Copyright 2004 by Michele Scicolone. Used with permission of the publisher, Wiley Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Nutritional Facts:

This Pasta with Cauliflower, Saffron, and Currants recipe is from the Cook'n in Italy Cookbook. Download this Cookbook today.


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Watch the video: Linguine alla bottarga per veri esperti. CENA ROMANTICA (November 2022).