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Tequila or High Water

Tequila or High Water


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This cocktail will pull a heist on your heart

Featuring just four simple ingredients, this tequila cocktail is inspired by the SAG Award-nominated Western film Hell or High Water. It’s a little bubbly, a little sweet and sour, and a little fiery, so it’s sure to steal your heart.

This recipe is courtesy of Sauza Tequila. We received samples to try this recipe without payment.

Ingredients

  • 1 Ounce tequila, preferably Sauza Signature Blue Silver Tequila
  • 1/2 Ounce lime juice
  • 1/2 Ounce simple syrup
  • 4 Ounces Champagne (chilled)

The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


The 14 Best Tequilas to Drink in 2021

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products you can learn more about our review process here . We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

In the Mexican state of Jalisco, everywhere are fields of blue agave—spiky cacti with big, sugary hearts called piñas. The juice of those piñas is then distilled into tequila. Processing them used to be slow work, but today, many distilleries in the valley surrounding the town of Tequila use high-tech chemical diffusers and additives to quickly produce the spirit. Aficionados like Grover and Scarlet Sanschagrin, the Jalisco-based founders of the website Tequila Matchmaker, prefer the old, artisan ways for the flavors they yield: herbs, spices, and the briny, bittersweet signature of agave.

Still, not everyone is a purist when it comes to tequila—some prefer it sweeter with muted agave notes. The Consejo Regulador del Tequila, the spirit’s regulatory body, Matchmaker, lists 1,754 tequilas currently in production, from unaged blancos to extra-añejos that spend upwards of three years in barrel. Whether you like your tequila neat or mixed with cocktails, here are the best tequilas available today.


Watch the video: Beer Drunk vs. Tequila Drunk: Whats The Difference? (February 2023).