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Europe’s Toxic Egg Scandal Expands to Frozen Waffles

Europe’s Toxic Egg Scandal Expands to Frozen Waffles


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Millions of eggs have been recalled, but other products are affected

Europe's toxic egg scandal involves millions of eggs and 17 different countries, and now it's expanded to frozen waffles, too.

Millions of eggs have been recalled around Europe after they were discovered to be tainted with a toxic insecticide. Now the toxic egg scandal has expanded to include frozen waffles.

The tainted egg scandal first came out on July 20 when eggs from Belgium and the Netherlands tested positive for fipronil. That’s exactly what happened.

According to ABC News, fipronil-tainted eggs were found at egg producers in Belgium, France, Germany and the Netherlands. They’ve been exported to 17 different countries. Millions of eggs have been recalled and destroyed.

The Local reports that the French Agriculture Ministry this week announced that 17 kinds of frozen waffles sold in stores including Monoprix, Carrefour, and other major supermarkets were also affected.

The waffles contained fipronil above the legal limit, but experts say they’re not likely to contain enough to be harmful if eaten.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


I Ate Cauliflower Every Day for a Week and Here's What Happened

Photo by: Stephen Johnson ©2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Stephen Johnson, 2014, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved.

Related To:

Step aside, kale. Cauliflower is the new “it” veggie soaking up the supermarket spotlight. From crackers to pizza crust, cauliflower’s trendiness (with a hashtag touting over 1.1 million Instagram posts…) has pioneered a plant-based demand across multiple grocery aisles. In fact, Instacart saw a 316 percent increase in cauliflower products sold from 2017 to 2018, and Uber Eats has seen more than 39 percent growth in orders containing cauliflower in just the past six months, according to representatives for the brands.

So what’s the deal? Is subbing in broccoli’s more popular cousin all that it’s cracked up to be? To find out, I did what anyone would do — I ate cauliflower everyday for a week. Riced, mashed, roasted, pressure-cooked, store-bought — I tried it all. Here’s what I found.

It’s Nutrient-Dense — and Filling!

Cauliflower may have cancer-fighting power and packs a noteworthy nutrition punch with 1 cup of fresh cauliflower being an excellent source of vitamins C and K and a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin B6. It’s no wonder the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) placed it on a list of “powerhouse fruits and vegetables.”

Food Network Kitchen’s Shrimp and Cauliflower Grits

I Didn’t Get Sick Of It

Because of its mild flavor, cauliflower is a versatile addition to virtually any meal — especially for gluten-free or carb-adverse eaters. Snack simply on roasted florets tossed in your favorite seasoning or healthy sauce (Exhibit A: Buffalo Cauliflower, pictured above), or use them as the base of healthier comfort food wins like Shrimp and Cauliflower “Grits”. I proudly lightened up my favorite hummus recipe by replacing half of the chickpeas for cauliflower rice and even blended (and surprisingly loved!) it into my morning smoothie, à la Barbara Lincoln, RD. “Frozen cauliflower in a smoothie is a great way to thicken it and add nutrients,” says Lincoln. Still left on my to-make-list: Cauliflower Brownies. (Yes, they’re a thing!)

It seems like you can’t go wrong when it comes to cauliflower prep. By the end of the week, I became partial to slicing up “steaks” as a hearty salad topper and found sautéing pre-packaged “rice” to be a time-saving way to beef up a meal without racking up macros. I can report that I successfully took a crack at making my own cauliflower pizza crust, and pre-made versions from Outer Aisle and Cali’Flour are as good as they are convenient. Oh, and like everyone else on your ‘gram feed, I’m also a huge fan of Trader Joe’s Cauliflower Gnocchi! I cannot wait to try other pasta varieties as they continue to become readily available.

Califlour Pasta

Outer Aisle Pizza Crust

Italian'Lite Stack Pack

It’s Waist-Friendly (Sort Of…)

Swapping in cauliflower may seem like a weight loss secret weapon, but doing it isn't necessarily a guarantee. “Don’t let the health halo fool you,” warns Mariana Dineen MS, RD, CDN, LD, founder of Pretty Nutritious. “Just because [a product] is gluten-free and made with cauliflower, you can’t assume it’s healthy. Unfortunately many end up being a refined low-carb, lower calorie product with diluted cauliflower superfood powers.” Rule of thumb: Be vigilant with your label reading, as you will find that many products contain cassava flour, potato starch, oils and cheese — all of which can add up! When whipping your own cauliflower dish, be mindful of additional ingredients and toppings. “You can save the calories and carbs from a regular pizza crust by using a cauliflower crust, but if you load it with meat and cheese you’ve negated your healthy swap,” explains Lincoln.

It Can Cause Tummy Troubles

While everyone’s tolerance is different, too much cauliflower can create G.I. distress, like excess gas and bloating. “Make sure to drink enough water to move it through your system,” suggests Lincoln. Cooking it can also dial back digestion woes.

FNK_CauliflowerTikkaMasala_H

Food Network Kitchen's Global Flavors: IIndian, Cauliflower Tikka Masala for LESSONS FROM GRANDMA/MICROWAVE VEGGIES/CHICKEN SOUP, as seen on Food Network

Photo by: Renee Comet ©© 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, © 2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Swapping cauliflower in for meat (especially if you go the frozen route!) will stretch both your food budget. Cauliflower Tikka Masala, for example, was a hit among my chicken-loving group of friends, for a fraction of the cost of take-out. Another dough-saving tip: Buy the whole head of cauliflower and rice it yourself.

*This article was written and/or reviewed by an independent registered dietitian nutritionist.


Watch the video: Hong Kong bubble waffles (November 2022).